Charities spend way too much time and money on fundraising. When you are donating to an organization, you want to do as much research and homework as you can about their use of funds and efficacy.

But once you have identified a charity that you like, you want to support them with as much predictability as you can possibly commit to.

A one-time $1000 gift is less useful than a $20/month commitment that you can support for years.

I was inspired by and wrote this article as a follow up to Paul Graham’s essay: http://paulgraham.com/donate.html where he makes the case that you should let the charitable organization decide how best to spend the dollars. I whole-heartedly agree.

But just as restricting use of dollars creates undue burdens, so does erratic and repeated efforts at collecting donations.

My advice applies to charities too. Don’t ask for one-time donations — learn from Apple, Netflix, Salesforce, and even the New York Times — subscription or recurring revenue is the best form of revenue.

The likes of Microsoft and Adobe were able to move their entire multi-billion dollar revenue streams from one time payments to recurring.

You can do the same.

CEO, Skyflow Privacy Vault, an API company.